Computer Languages – From E-mails to Facebook!

The new IT trend has probably changed the definition of the term “language” completely. It is no more confined to “what and how we speak”. The computer languages can be best described as a formal language that specifies a set of instructions that can be used to produce various kinds of output. Programming languages generally consist of instructions for a computer. Programming languages can be used to create programs that implement specific algorithms. There are so many computer languages these days, each of them are unique in their ways. Discovered for specific tasks, few such languages are:

  •  Assembly language:

An assembly language, is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device, in which there is a very strong (but often not one-to-one) correspondence between the language and the architecture’s machine code instructions. Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture. In contrast, most high-level programming languages are generally portable across multiple architectures but require interpreting or compiling. Assembly language may also be called symbolic machine code. Assembly language uses a mnemonic to represent each low-level machine instruction or opcode, typically also each architectural register, flag, etc.

  •    C language:

C is a general-purpose, imperative computer programming language, supporting structured programming, lexical variable scope and recursion, while a static type system prevents many unintended operations. By design, C provides constructs that map efficiently to typical machine instructions, and therefore it has found lasting use in applications that had formerly been coded in assembly language, including operating systems, as well as various application software for computers ranging from supercomputers to embedded systems.

  •    JAVA:

Java is a general-purpose computer programming language that is concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, and specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers “write once, run anywhere” (WORA), meaning that compiled Java code can run on all platforms that support Java without the need for recompilation. Java applications are typically compiled to byte code that can run on any Java virtual machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture.

  •    HTML:

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is the standard markup language for creating web pages and web applications. With Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript it forms a triad of cornerstone technologies for the World Wide Web. Web browsers receive HTML documents from a web server or from local storage and render them into multimedia web pages. HTML describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document. HTML elements are the building blocks of HTML pages. With HTML constructs, images and other objects, such as interactive forms, may be embedded into the rendered page.

  •    PHP:

PHP is a server-side scripting language designed primarily for web development but also used as a general-purpose programming language. Originally created by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1994, the PHP reference implementation is now produced by The PHP Development Team. PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page, but it now stands for the recursive acronym PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor.  PHP code may be embedded into HTML or HTML5 markup, or it can be used in combination with various web template systems, web content management systems and web frameworks.

 

There are a lot more such languages such as Python, Dot Net, Xilinx etc. these play a very vital role in making you upgraded and updated with the tech-world. For all the IT freaks out there it is must to have knowledge of these basic languages. These languages are monitoring the world today, starting from e-mails to all the social networking sites all these functions are only possible because of such hi-tech computer languages.

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